Tree Protection Bylaw Review

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Our residents take great pride in their community and the natural environment. Trees are an important part of our local environment because they contribute to our health and well-being, and they help us respond to the effects of climate change.

Canopy cover (the proportion of land area covered by tree crowns as seen from the sky) is one way to keep track of the benefits we get from trees – for example, a dense canopy cover can lower temperatures in the area and reduce the negative effects of heavy rainfall and strong winds. Port Moody has lost canopy cover in recent decades as neighbourhoods have been redeveloped and the community has evolved.

What is the Tree Protection Bylaw?

Port Moody’s current Tree Protection Bylaw was adopted in 1999 and last updated in 2015. It protects trees and regulates the removal of trees with a diameter of 10 centimetres or greater that are:

  • on City lands;
  • located in an environmentally sensitive area or streamside protection and enhancement area;
  • on a multi-unit property (e.g. condo, townhouse, duplex);
  • on a property with a covenant registered on the Certificate of Title that relates to trees and landscaping; or
  • on a property subject to a development permit.

The Tree Protection Bylaw also offers protection to any tree identified, and approved by Council, as significant because of its importance to the community, including for heritage or landmark values or as wildlife habitat.

Why are we doing a review?

Responding to Port Moody’s strong environmental stewardship values and the climate emergency, the City is reviewing its bylaw to ensure it is aligned with best management practices and community values.

The Tree Protection Bylaw Review will seek to:

  • confirm community values, goals, and concerns related to the management of trees on private property;
  • identify challenges and opportunities with the current bylaw; and
  • recommend bylaw updates reflecting Council direction, best management practices, municipal tools available, and community input.

Community engagement on the Tree Protection Bylaw Review will take place in three phases. In the first phase of engagement, we sought input from the public via our community survey on urban forest management. In phase two, we will gather input on community values and preferences for tree protection requirements and tree removal in Port Moody. Input collected will inform the development of key directions for bylaw updates.

In the third and final phase of engagement, we will share proposed key directions for bylaw updates and invite people to provide feedback. Feedback collected will inform the development of draft updates to the Tree Protection Bylaw.

How can you get involved?

Leave a comment
Click on the “Leave a comment” tab to share your thoughts. What do you think about Port Moody’s current requirements for tree protection? Are there any changes you’d like to see?

>> Go back to the Trees in Port Moody landing page. Visit the linked Urban Forest Management Strategy project.

Our residents take great pride in their community and the natural environment. Trees are an important part of our local environment because they contribute to our health and well-being, and they help us respond to the effects of climate change.

Canopy cover (the proportion of land area covered by tree crowns as seen from the sky) is one way to keep track of the benefits we get from trees – for example, a dense canopy cover can lower temperatures in the area and reduce the negative effects of heavy rainfall and strong winds. Port Moody has lost canopy cover in recent decades as neighbourhoods have been redeveloped and the community has evolved.

What is the Tree Protection Bylaw?

Port Moody’s current Tree Protection Bylaw was adopted in 1999 and last updated in 2015. It protects trees and regulates the removal of trees with a diameter of 10 centimetres or greater that are:

  • on City lands;
  • located in an environmentally sensitive area or streamside protection and enhancement area;
  • on a multi-unit property (e.g. condo, townhouse, duplex);
  • on a property with a covenant registered on the Certificate of Title that relates to trees and landscaping; or
  • on a property subject to a development permit.

The Tree Protection Bylaw also offers protection to any tree identified, and approved by Council, as significant because of its importance to the community, including for heritage or landmark values or as wildlife habitat.

Why are we doing a review?

Responding to Port Moody’s strong environmental stewardship values and the climate emergency, the City is reviewing its bylaw to ensure it is aligned with best management practices and community values.

The Tree Protection Bylaw Review will seek to:

  • confirm community values, goals, and concerns related to the management of trees on private property;
  • identify challenges and opportunities with the current bylaw; and
  • recommend bylaw updates reflecting Council direction, best management practices, municipal tools available, and community input.

Community engagement on the Tree Protection Bylaw Review will take place in three phases. In the first phase of engagement, we sought input from the public via our community survey on urban forest management. In phase two, we will gather input on community values and preferences for tree protection requirements and tree removal in Port Moody. Input collected will inform the development of key directions for bylaw updates.

In the third and final phase of engagement, we will share proposed key directions for bylaw updates and invite people to provide feedback. Feedback collected will inform the development of draft updates to the Tree Protection Bylaw.

How can you get involved?

Leave a comment
Click on the “Leave a comment” tab to share your thoughts. What do you think about Port Moody’s current requirements for tree protection? Are there any changes you’d like to see?

>> Go back to the Trees in Port Moody landing page. Visit the linked Urban Forest Management Strategy project.

  • About Port Moody’s current Tree Protection Bylaw

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    Port Moody's Tree Protection Bylaw currently includes the following elements:


    Requirement to submit an arborist report

    An application for a tree removal permit must be accompanied by an arborist report that includes:

    • details of the proposed practices and procedures for tree and vegetation protection during removal and replanting;
    • a map identifying and documentation confirming any existing tree retention areas, streamside protection and enhancement areas, and environmentally sensitive areas within or adjacent to the subject land
    • a description of predominant species, approximate age, size, condition, location, and number of trees within the subject land;
    • a map identifying and documentation confirming any significant trees or wildlife trees located within the subject land;
    • a Tree Removal Plan, complete with a map locating all trees and vegetation proposed to be removed;
    • a Tree Retention Plan; and
    • a Tree Replanting Plan, complete with a map identifying proposed replacement trees, and showing the replanting of two or more replacement trees for each tree removed from the land.


    Requirements to replace trees removed

    • For every bylaw-protected tree removed, two replacement trees are required
    • The replacement trees must be of the same species as the tree removed
    • Where space is insufficient to plant trees on site, a cash-in-lieu option is available for the applicant to fund the planting of replacement trees on public land


    Protection of retained trees

    • An arborist must make recommendations on tree protection and ensure that these recommendations are considered throughout the construction process.
    • The owner must ensure that all tree retention areas are protected from disruption, injury, or damage.


    To read more about trees on private property and the full Tree Protection Bylaw, visit portmoody.ca/trees.

Page last updated: 13 Jun 2022, 08:50 AM