Climate Ready Homes and Buildings

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We’re developing a plan that will outline specific actions the City, residents, and business owners can take to make homes and buildings in Port Moody climate ready. What is “climate ready”? A climate ready home or building is one that has been designed or modified to:

  • meet low carbon and high energy-efficiency standards; and
  • manage many of the risks related to climate change such as heat-related illness, poor indoor air quality, or damage from flooding or windstorms.

Please note that definitions for words in bold type can be found in our list of key terms.

Why are we developing a climate ready homes and buildings plan?

City Council has declared a climate emergency and we are in the process of implementing the City’s Climate Action Plan. The Climate Action Plan outlines a path that could see Port Moody reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by more than 40 per cent (when compared to 2007 levels) by the year 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. The City’s goals include reaching specific targets related to buildings:

  • by 2030, all new and replacement heating and hot water systems are zero emissions
  • by 2030, all oil and propane heating and hot water systems have been replaced with zero-emissions systems
  • by 2050, heating and hot water systems have been replaced with zero-emissions systems in all buildings

We are committed to taking bold action because the future of our community and our planet depends on it. But to make a difference, we need everyone to get involved – builders, homeowners, property managers, business owners, and more. That’s because homes and buildings are responsible for a significant proportion (46 per cent in 2016) of GHG emissions in Port Moody. Reducing these emissions can have a big impact, whether we’re talking about smaller structures like single-family homes and small businesses or larger ones like multi-family dwellings and industrial buildings.

The majority of GHG emissions produced by homes and buildings come from fossil-fuel-powered heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The key to reducing emissions is to build or renovate structures so they meet high energy-efficiency and low carbon standards. We also need our homes and buildings to last, which means they need to be able to withstand the effects of climate change such as extreme rainfall events, extreme heat, drought, wildfire, poor air quality, and sea level rise. How can we as a community achieve these goals? Our plan will help us take collective action to improve our homes and buildings, so that we can build a better future for everyone who chooses to live or work in Port Moody.

How can you get involved?

Thank you for your interest – our community survey has now concluded. In November/December 2021 we asked residents and business owners/operators to share their thoughts on making homes and buildings climate ready. The input we received will inform the development of our community-wide plan.

Find out more

Click on the Background tab below to take a look at our resources. Learn more about:

  • sources of greenhouse gas emissions in Port Moody
  • why it's important to make homes and buildings climate ready
  • ways to make your home or workspace climate ready



We’re developing a plan that will outline specific actions the City, residents, and business owners can take to make homes and buildings in Port Moody climate ready. What is “climate ready”? A climate ready home or building is one that has been designed or modified to:

  • meet low carbon and high energy-efficiency standards; and
  • manage many of the risks related to climate change such as heat-related illness, poor indoor air quality, or damage from flooding or windstorms.

Please note that definitions for words in bold type can be found in our list of key terms.

Why are we developing a climate ready homes and buildings plan?

City Council has declared a climate emergency and we are in the process of implementing the City’s Climate Action Plan. The Climate Action Plan outlines a path that could see Port Moody reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by more than 40 per cent (when compared to 2007 levels) by the year 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. The City’s goals include reaching specific targets related to buildings:

  • by 2030, all new and replacement heating and hot water systems are zero emissions
  • by 2030, all oil and propane heating and hot water systems have been replaced with zero-emissions systems
  • by 2050, heating and hot water systems have been replaced with zero-emissions systems in all buildings

We are committed to taking bold action because the future of our community and our planet depends on it. But to make a difference, we need everyone to get involved – builders, homeowners, property managers, business owners, and more. That’s because homes and buildings are responsible for a significant proportion (46 per cent in 2016) of GHG emissions in Port Moody. Reducing these emissions can have a big impact, whether we’re talking about smaller structures like single-family homes and small businesses or larger ones like multi-family dwellings and industrial buildings.

The majority of GHG emissions produced by homes and buildings come from fossil-fuel-powered heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The key to reducing emissions is to build or renovate structures so they meet high energy-efficiency and low carbon standards. We also need our homes and buildings to last, which means they need to be able to withstand the effects of climate change such as extreme rainfall events, extreme heat, drought, wildfire, poor air quality, and sea level rise. How can we as a community achieve these goals? Our plan will help us take collective action to improve our homes and buildings, so that we can build a better future for everyone who chooses to live or work in Port Moody.

How can you get involved?

Thank you for your interest – our community survey has now concluded. In November/December 2021 we asked residents and business owners/operators to share their thoughts on making homes and buildings climate ready. The input we received will inform the development of our community-wide plan.

Find out more

Click on the Background tab below to take a look at our resources. Learn more about:

  • sources of greenhouse gas emissions in Port Moody
  • why it's important to make homes and buildings climate ready
  • ways to make your home or workspace climate ready



  • Key terms

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    Carbon neutrality means having a balance between the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere and the amount of carbon dioxide absorbed (mostly by natural environments such as forests and oceans). Carbon dioxide is the primary greenhouse gas released through human activities.

    Climate change is when there is a big difference in normal climate patterns over a long period of time. Weather and climate are two different things. Weather is what we experience in the moment; climate describes the broader trends that make certain weather experiences more or less likely.

    Extreme heat is defined as summertime temperatures that are much hotter and/or humid than average. Because some places are hotter than others, this depends on what’s considered average for a particular location at that time of year. Extreme heat increases the risk of heat-related illnesses, like heat exhaustion or heat stroke, that can worsen pre-existing health conditions. In extreme situations, these illnesses can lead to permanent disability or death.

    Greenhouse gases are certain gases (both natural and human-made) in the atmosphere (e.g. water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) that trap energy from the sun. The trapped energy causes the Earth’s temperature to rise – this is called the greenhouse effect.

    Without greenhouse gases, heat would escape back into space and Earth’s average temperature would be -18°C. Human activities over the last 150 years, however, have led to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions, a rise in global temperatures (global warming), and climate change.

    Low carbon means producing low levels of the greenhouse gases that are driving global climate change (mainly carbon dioxide, which is released through a wide variety of human activities such as deforestation and the burning of fossil fuels).

    Sea level rise is an increase in the level of the world’s oceans that is happening because of global climate change. Sea level rise poses a serious threat to waterfront areas around the world. Consequences include increased flooding during high tides and storm surges, as well as water levels that gradually increase along the shore.

    Zero emissions means that an energy source emits no waste products that pollute the environment or disrupt the climate.


  • Sources of GHG emissions in Port Moody

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    (Note: click the title link for more information)
    Our individual and collective daily activities result in releasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that contribute to climate change, including: transporting people and goods, heating and cooling buildings, heating hot water, and purchased goods/materials that end up in the landfill.

    The latest data we have is from 2016, when these activities resulted in 103,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions. You can see from the pie chart below that most community emissions are a result of vehicles (53%) and heating and cooling buildings (46%).

    The City of Port Moody is directly responsible for between 1% and 2% of community emissions.

    These emissions are the result of delivering City services to residents, including emergency services (fire, police, emergency preparedness), waste management (garbage, recycling, green waste), recreation, parks and trails management, and maintenance of roads and sidewalks.

    Most of the City’s emissions come from buildings (54%) and fleet vehicles (35%).



  • Why make homes and buildings climate ready?

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    Climate ready homes and buildings are good for us, and good for the planet. Here are four reasons why:

    1. Health

    Unlike many of today’s buildings, zero-emissions buildings do not produce harmful air pollutants that affect human and environmental health.

    Structures that are energy efficient help to prevent harmful air pollutants from entering the home and filter out impurities.

    2. Climate change impacts

    Buildings are the second largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Port Moody, due to heating, cooling, and hot water heating.

    Making homes and buildings more energy efficient and choosing low-carbon energy systems reduces greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. We are already seeing climate change impacts, such as extreme heat, drought, wildfire, poor air quality, and sea level rise, that affect human health and damage property.

    3. Reduce costs

    Energy-efficient homes and buildings don’t require as much energy to heat and cool – this means lower energy bills.

    4. Increase comfort

    Energy-efficient and low-carbon homes and buildings have better temperature control and better indoor air quality, and they are quieter. All of these things make it more comfortable for the people who live or work inside.

  • How can we make homes and buildings climate ready?

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    Here are some ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and/or increase energy efficiency:

    • adopt energy-saving behaviours (e.g. turn off lights, turn down the thermostat)
    • replace lightbulbs with LED lighting
    • install low-flow plumbing fixtures
    • install a smart thermostat
    • choose ENERGY STAR rated appliance(s)
    • upgrade your heating system to a high-efficiency boiler or furnace
    • upgrade your heating system to an electric heat pump or baseboards
    • upgrade your hot water system to a high-efficiency electric hot water heater
    • put additional insulation into walls, roof, or basement
    • replace windows with double- or triple-paned glass

    Not sure what changes or upgrades might make a difference in your home or workspace? Consider hiring a registered energy advisor to conduct an energy audit. Visit betterhomes.bc.ca for information on available home heating and home upgrade rebates.

    A climate ready home or building is better able to withstand the effects of climate change, such as extreme rainfall events, extreme heat, drought, wildfire, poor air quality, and sea level rise. Here are some ways to manage risks related to climate change:

    • install a heat pump system that heats your home or workspace in the winter and cools it down in the summer
    • use central or portable air purifier systems to reduce indoor air pollution
    • use drought-tolerant plant species in your landscaping
    • use water conservation measures such as harvesting rain or reusing greywater (i.e. household water that’s already been used, sourced from baths, showers, bathroom basins, and laundries – this does not include water from a toilet, kitchen sink, or dishwasher) for low-risk purposes such as watering lawns or ornamental gardens
    • use fire-resistant building materials
    • follow the FireSmart homeowner’s guide to protect your home and community from wildfire
    • ensure you have permeable areas on your property (e.g. use permeable paving that allows water to pass through, make sure landscaped areas slope away from home)
    • add physical flood barriers where necessary (e.g. retaining walls or rip rap)
    • install sump pump or backflow valves



Page last updated: 06 December 2021, 11:17