Port Moody 2050: updating our Official Community Plan

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Port Moody 2050 is a one- to two-year process to gather public input and draft focused updates to the Official Community Plan, our long-term vision for the future. This plan is important because it communicates our values and guides us as we make decisions about how we use land for housing, transportation, parks, environmental protection, economic development, and more. It’s your plan for your city, so we want to hear your voice.

Community Survey #2 is open – share your thoughts with us today! This survey, which will remain open through June 28, 2021, covers key topics that were identified by the public and City Council in our initial phases of engagement.

Your input will help us prepare land use scenarios and options for four Port Moody neighbourhood areas: Seaview, Moody Centre Transit-Oriented Development Area, Oceanfront District (west of Rocky Point Park), and Murray Street. You’ll have a chance to give us your feedback on these land use scenarios in our next phase of public engagement planned for September/October 2021.

There are more ways to get involved! Tell us your Port Moody story. Why do you choose to live in this city we call home? Whether you grew up in Port Moody or you moved here as an adult, you have a story to tell and we want to hear it. Simply click on "Share your story" below and start writing. You can also ask a question or leave a comment below.

Thank you to everyone who participated in Community Survey #1: Vision and Goals. Read our engagement summary to find out what we heard from the community when we asked for feedback on the vision and goal statements in the 2014 Official Community Plan.

Together, we’ll explore how we want Port Moody to evolve over the next 30 years, focusing on our overall vision as well as specific areas of the city: the Moody Centre Transit-Oriented Development Area, the Oceanfront District, the Seaview neighbourhood, and Murray Street.

Port Moody 2050 will include several opportunities for you to get involved in a meaningful way. Throughout the process, we want you to share your thoughts and ideas with us and with others in the community. Your input will inform Council’s decision-making as they consider proposed updates to the Official Community Plan.

We’re all a part of what makes Port Moody such a great place. And we can all play a role and work together to shape our city’s future. Use your voice to help us create a plan for the next 30 years that reflects the shared values and goals of our diverse community. Register today so we can keep you informed throughout the process.



Port Moody 2050 is a one- to two-year process to gather public input and draft focused updates to the Official Community Plan, our long-term vision for the future. This plan is important because it communicates our values and guides us as we make decisions about how we use land for housing, transportation, parks, environmental protection, economic development, and more. It’s your plan for your city, so we want to hear your voice.

Community Survey #2 is open – share your thoughts with us today! This survey, which will remain open through June 28, 2021, covers key topics that were identified by the public and City Council in our initial phases of engagement.

Your input will help us prepare land use scenarios and options for four Port Moody neighbourhood areas: Seaview, Moody Centre Transit-Oriented Development Area, Oceanfront District (west of Rocky Point Park), and Murray Street. You’ll have a chance to give us your feedback on these land use scenarios in our next phase of public engagement planned for September/October 2021.

There are more ways to get involved! Tell us your Port Moody story. Why do you choose to live in this city we call home? Whether you grew up in Port Moody or you moved here as an adult, you have a story to tell and we want to hear it. Simply click on "Share your story" below and start writing. You can also ask a question or leave a comment below.

Thank you to everyone who participated in Community Survey #1: Vision and Goals. Read our engagement summary to find out what we heard from the community when we asked for feedback on the vision and goal statements in the 2014 Official Community Plan.

Together, we’ll explore how we want Port Moody to evolve over the next 30 years, focusing on our overall vision as well as specific areas of the city: the Moody Centre Transit-Oriented Development Area, the Oceanfront District, the Seaview neighbourhood, and Murray Street.

Port Moody 2050 will include several opportunities for you to get involved in a meaningful way. Throughout the process, we want you to share your thoughts and ideas with us and with others in the community. Your input will inform Council’s decision-making as they consider proposed updates to the Official Community Plan.

We’re all a part of what makes Port Moody such a great place. And we can all play a role and work together to shape our city’s future. Use your voice to help us create a plan for the next 30 years that reflects the shared values and goals of our diverse community. Register today so we can keep you informed throughout the process.



Port Moody 2050

Do you have a question about our process to gather public input and update the Official Community Plan? Post it here and we'll do our best to respond to you directly or on this page within three business days. 

Please check our FAQs as well for information about Port Moody 2050.

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    What is the plan for schools in light of the major growth occurring the next year let alone 5 or 30’years from now? Are new schools planned? This must be addressed.

    AimeeRita asked 3 months ago

    Every year School District No. 43 engages municipalities to provide 10 year housing projections separated by housing type.  SD43 uses these projections to identify the need for and location of new school sites in the district and then sets the School Sites Acquisition Charge (a per dwelling unit charge paid by residential developers) accordingly to fund these new school sites.  The projection information provided by the City of Port Moody is based on existing development projects nearing construction completion and development applications at earlier stages of approval.   Future longer term residential growth is also considered as part of this process, particularly those areas anticipated to experience significant growth beyond the 10 year projection horizon.  A July 28, 2020 Report to Council related to this process can be found here (see Item 5.8).  General information on School Site Acquisition Charge Regulation can also be found on the Province’s website .

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    Our current OCP appears to be easily manipulated. What is the point of putting extra time and money into a new OCP if developers will continue to request changes (and get approved) to alter the OCP?

    taraturtle asked 5 months ago

    The Official Community Plan (OCP) is our long-term vision for Port Moody. This document provides the City with policies to guide land use, services, and the physical, social, and economic changes in our community. Although it is not expected to be revised on a frequent basis, an OCP can be amended to respond to changing conditions and values thereby keeping the plan alive and relevant.  This makes the OCP a dynamic document.   

    For the OCP to reflect the needs and aspirations of Port Moody residents, it must evolve as conditions and values change in the community and region. New opportunities will present themselves and new approaches to addressing issues and needs will continue to be developed. 

    Any changes to the OCP, including those related to new development, involve an extensive review by city staff, external agencies, community members, and Council before consideration of approval. This process ensures that the vision and needs of the community are compatible with the proposal.

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    Will the city focus on road infrastructure to accommodate all the development and people moving into the city? Primarily St.John, Moody towards the Barnett Highway

    Ryan asked 6 months ago

    As part of the region’s Major Road Network, St. Johns Street facilitates movement not only within Port Moody, but also provides important connections to other parts of the region.  As such, it accommodates both local and regional traffic and is affected by growth beyond Port Moody’s borders. 

    The City’s Master Transportation Plan, TransPort Moody, identifies how St. Johns Street in particular will function in the short and long term.  This includes a street redesign to accommodate a multi-modal shift to other forms of transportation (e.g. cycling, walking, and transit) to reduce reliance on vehicles. 

    More detail on future plans for St. Johns Street can be found in the TransPort Moody, Port Moody’s Master Transportation Plan

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    Hello, Thank you for your response to my question from January 18, but it clearly does not address my question/concern, it just CONFIRMS the information that I have received from the developer that the grocery store in your plan IS A SMALL GROCERY STORE and not meant to satisfy all grocery needs of the surrounding community. I was clearly told that this grocery store is meant more as a last minute drop by and not as a proper big grocery supplier. So please, respond again: how is city of Port Moody planning to address a proper grocery needs of 50K new residents of all new developments with a small community grocer in addition to one IGA and one Thrifty's stores, which in themselves are not big grocers? How long are the residents of Port Moody be doomed to drive to Coquitlam two Superstore locations, Save-On, Walmart, and Costco to haul their groceries as with growing towers and population Port Moody has none of those and it seems the OCP does not plan a single proper big grocer? Especially, that Coquitlam has its own plan for developing more highrises and growing its population. Like transit, a big grocer is a basic residential need! Please respond! PS. Suprisingly, I have not found my question on 2 pages of Q&A on engage@portmoody - why? Sincerely, Bo

    Bo asked 4 months ago

    For the Moody Centre Transit-Oriented Development Area, the OCP does not state that the grocery store is intended to be small. The fact that a grocery store is specifically included as a desired use in the redevelopment of this area speaks to how important this component is for this area.  A large comprehensive development of the Moody Centre TOD area provides the best opportunity to integrate a large grocery store as part of an overall development plan, particularly when combined with new residential growth to support this use.  The specific details related to building form and uses are determined at the rezoning stage of a development.  Rezoning approval is subject to public input and requires Council approval.  Important components such as a grocery store can be formalized at this stage.

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    How many co-ops are being planned?

    Lasta A. Graf asked 4 months ago

    At this time, there are no co-ops under application with the City. Co-ops are encouraged as a form of affordable housing and City staff maintain contact with the Co-operative Housing Federation of B.C. and Metro Vancouver Housing Corporation regarding potential co-op housing opportunities in Port Moody.

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    Why does city council keep asking our opinion? You sent out a survey about these same issues in 2014/2015.....cant we just move forward on developing Coronaton Park so that it doesnt look so ugly in the middle of our city? Seems like you have wasted 20 years of the 50 year plan on asking repetitive questions.

    Kathy Batdossy asked 4 months ago

    OCPs are typically reviewed and considered for revision every 5-10 years.  It's been 7 years since the public was last asked to comment on the OCP's vision and goals and a lot has changed over this time.  The 2020/2021 Official Community Plan update provides an opportunity for all community members to reflect on the current directions that guide growth in Port Moody and share their vision and priorities for the future of the City.

    The development review process for the Coronation Park application is underway and is not tied to the timelines for the Port Moody 2050 Official Community Plan update.

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    I have participated in several community consultations in regards to the Moody Centre Transit Oriented future development that will bring thousands of new inhabitants to Port Moody, yet there was only one small grocery store planned for this development. As it is, Port Moody does not have a big grocery store but rather relies on one Thrifty's, one IGA, two smallish drug stores, one Cob's and an Italian bakery. With the population having grown in recent years through Suterbrook development including 2 towers and 1 low-rise still coming, now Electronic Avenue Development, soon Coronation Hill redevelopment, all bringing huge population growth, I have asked the organizers if at least one big grocery store is anticipated for Port Moody Centre. The answer was that no, private developers are not responsible for that at all, they are responsible only for providing a small, corner store type commercial services. I was told that it would be up to a big store companies as Superstore, or Save-On-Foods to pursue development to bring a proper big grocer to people. My question is how and if the City of Port Moody can secure a proper big grocer with other necessary services like a drug store, Canada Post service that would be convenient for all those huge populations to access without the necessity of driving to Coquitlam? After the last new towers are populated in Suterbrook, I cannot imagine Thrifty's being able to adequately serving just the Suterbrook population, and what about the new population of Coronation Hill, new low-rises along the St. John's St that are under construction? And even Thrifty's doesn't offer everything that is needed for a family's every day needs. We still have to keep driving to Coquitlam's Superstore to get our needs met. There is a vacant piece of land at the Barnett Hwy and Clarke's cross-section that would be a perfect spot for a big grocer surely helping citizens from around the Port Moody Centre even now, and not mentioning all the developments coming in the future. What is City of Port Moody doing to resolve this basic commercial need of it's inhabitants?

    Bo asked 4 months ago

    The current Official Community Plan policy framework for the Moody Centre Transit-Oriented Development area makes specific reference to the provision of a grocery store (see Policy #2 on page 93 at this link). It is expected that the Official Community Plan amendment application currently under review and future rezoning applications for this area will meet this policy objective

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    How are we keeping track of expected increases in our population due to development? Are we making sure that developers are aware of our expected 50K population by 2041?

    Jim Atkinson asked 4 months ago

    Information on the tracking of expected population increases resulting from development can be found on the City’s website here. Analysis of population increases and impacts related to proposed development occurs as part of the development application review process.

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    We have significant traffic issues around Clark St. and St John's St. People drive around as if these streets are highways. They ignore stop signs and general driving rules. Why hasn't the city done anything about this issue? We have children and residents walking around the area and being almost hit by cars. Personally this has happened to me at least 6 times.

    Gonz Bala asked 4 months ago

    The City Master Transportation Plan includes policies that identified capital projects to promote multi-modal use and improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists. These projects are funded through two processes, either the City capital plan or development applications. 

     Through the City’s Capital plan recent safety improvements completed along the Clarke Street and St Johns Street Corridors include a new pedestrian activated traffic signal at Elgin Street, signal coordination and lane marking at Moray Street and designs to improve street lighting levels at 5 intersections. Ongoing work includes plans for traffic restrictions to reduce traffic volumes on Spring Street and St George Street and planning for the future streetscape upgrades along St Johns Street including bike facilities. 

    Through development new infrastructure that is currently underway includes widened sidewalks and a new traffic signal at Golden Spike Way. 

    The City will continue to work on the implementation of transportation projects across the municipality to expand the bicycle and pedestrian networks and improve user safety.


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    How is Port Moody engaging with other parts of the GVRD to share planing and policy knowledge? Certain new developments, live Coronation Park and the Moody TOD are significantly larger than typical Port Moody developments, and it would be nice to learn from other cities that may have gone through similar growing pains.

    Megan asked 4 months ago

    Port Moody staff actively participate in Metro Vancouver regional committees which discuss a range of topic areas and issues affecting the region including land use planning, housing, social issues, engineering, transportation, environment, parks and climate change.  These provide invaluable forums for municipal and regional representatives to share experiences and resources and to provide and receive input on local land use planning directions.